A fever in the heartland : the Ku Klux Klan's plot to take over America, and the woman who stopped them
(Book)

Book Cover
Published
[New York, New York] : Viking, [2023].
ISBN
9780735225268, 0735225265
Physical Desc
xxiv, 404 pages, 8 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations ; 24 cm
Status
Dedham Endicott - Adult
322.42 EGAN, T.
1 available

Copies

LocationCall NumberStatus
Dedham - Adult322.42 EGAN, T.Checked Out
Dedham Endicott - Adult322.42 EGAN, T.On Shelf
LocationCall NumberStatus
Acton - Adult322.4209 EGAOn Shelf
Acton West - Adult322.4209 EGAOn Shelf
Arlington - Adult322.4209 EGAChecked Out
Arlington Fox - Adult322.4209 EGAOn Shelf
Bedford - New Books322.42/EgaBilled
Show All Copies

More Details

Published
[New York, New York] : Viking, [2023].
Format
Book
Language
English
ISBN
9780735225268, 0735225265

Notes

General Note
Place of publication from publisher's website.
Bibliography
Includes bibliographical references and index.
Description
"A historical thriller by the Pulitzer and National Book Award-winning author that tells the riveting story of the Klan's rise to power in the 1920s, the cunning con man who drove that rise, and the woman who stopped them. The Roaring Twenties--the Jazz Age--has been characterized as a time of Gatsby frivolity. But it was also the height of the uniquely American hate group, the Ku Klux Klan. Their domain was not the old Confederacy, but the Heartland and the West. They hated Blacks, Jews, Catholics and immigrants in equal measure, and took radical steps to keep these people from the American promise. And the man who set in motion their takeover of great swaths of America was a charismatic charlatan named D.C. Stephenson. Stephenson was a magnetic presence whose life story changed with every telling. Within two years of his arrival in Indiana, he'd become the Grand Dragon of the state and and the architect of the strategy that brought the group out of the shadows--their message endorsed from the pulpits of local churches, spread at family picnics and town celebrations. Judges, prosecutors, ministers, governors and senators across the country all proudly proclaimed their membership. But at the peak of his influence, it was a seemingly powerless woman--Madge Oberholtzer--who would reveal his secret cruelties, and whose deathbed testimony finally brought the Klan to their knees"--,Provided by publisher.

Description

Loading Description...

More Like This

Loading more titles like this title...

NoveList

Other Editions and Formats

Citations

APA Citation, 7th Edition (style guide)

Egan, T. (2023). A fever in the heartland: the Ku Klux Klan's plot to take over America, and the woman who stopped them . Viking.

Chicago / Turabian - Author Date Citation, 17th Edition (style guide)

Egan, Timothy. 2023. A Fever in the Heartland: The Ku Klux Klan's Plot to Take Over America, and the Woman Who Stopped Them. Viking.

Chicago / Turabian - Humanities (Notes and Bibliography) Citation, 17th Edition (style guide)

Egan, Timothy. A Fever in the Heartland: The Ku Klux Klan's Plot to Take Over America, and the Woman Who Stopped Them Viking, 2023.

MLA Citation, 9th Edition (style guide)

Egan, Timothy. A Fever in the Heartland: The Ku Klux Klan's Plot to Take Over America, and the Woman Who Stopped Them Viking, 2023.

Note! Citations contain only title, author, edition, publisher, and year published. Citations should be used as a guideline and should be double checked for accuracy. Citation formats are based on standards as of August 2021.

Staff View

Loading Staff View.